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"Brother to Brother" and James Baldwin tees celebrating black queer writing on sale at: http://mekebadesign.bigcartel.com
Please spread the word and Support!

"Brother to Brother" and James Baldwin tees celebrating black queer writing on sale at: http://mekebadesign.bigcartel.com

Please spread the word and Support!

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liquorinthefront:

GAYFACE: 1st Class
Special Edition Portrait Book of the LGBTQ community, that gives the viewer an intimate look inside their diverse identities. This project celebrates the color, vibrance and diversity of a community that for decades has been in the dark.

Help out by donating to their fundraiser page! Click here to donate and/or find out more about the project. You can also check out the GAYFACE Facebook page.

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incogneeco:

anigrrrl2:

the-goddamazon:

fuckyeahbiguys:

"I’m sick of how bisexuality is erased in LGBT spaces. I get really nervous before any LGBT event, especially Pride. I feel incredibly sad and hopeless when gay and lesbian people call me insulting names. If gay and lesbian people don’t understand me – Continue reading Prejudice at Pride at Empathize This

This just punched me in the heart.

It’s hard to admit that this happens in our community, but it definitely does. Speaking out is the only way it will stop. 

I swear it’s like reading an autobiography of my recent life.

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bisexual-books:

All this week we will be highlighting #27BiStories from bisexual Advocate journalist Eliel Cruz with graphics by Trivo Studio 

Part 2 — #27BiStories: When Did You Come Out? What Was The Response Like?

Hoping to shine a light on the myths about the bisexual community — both in and out of lesbian, gay, transgender, and queer spaces — The Advocate has launched a four-part series written from interviews with 27 self-identified bisexuals, all of whom happen to be in relationships. Earlier this week, we asked our sources to confont the biggest misconceptions they face as bisexual people, and today, we’re turning our attention to the “coming out” stories that so often unite members of the LGBT community. 

Do those stories provide the same kind of “we’ve all been there” unity that many in the lesbian, gay, and transgender communities experience when sharing their own coming-outs? Or do bisexual people face ridicule and disbelief from the very people who claim to want to liberate others from the closet? Read on to find out. 

This is #27BiStories. 

(via incogneeco)

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blackboybe:

First week on testosterone vs. Two years on Testosterone.

blackboybe:

First week on testosterone vs. Two years on Testosterone.

(via dinyvontessa)

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importantpugge:

this has been a good year for my hair i hope that my hair will flourish again in 2015

(via importantpugge)

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mad-sad-tender:

i’m a ghost

(via mad-sad-tender)

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sugaryumyum:

Argentina: doing it right. After passing a groundbreaking gender identity law on Wednesday, Argentina, which became the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage, now leads the entire world when it comes to trans rights.
The new law, which was passed by 55-0 and is expected to be signed by president Cristina Fernandez, grants trans people the right to legally change their gender identity without having to get approval from doctors or judges–and, importantly, without having to change their bodies at all first. Not having a valid ID that matches your gender identity is a huge barrier to access to education, employment, health care, you name it. As Kalym Sori, an Argentinian trans man said, “This is why the law of identity is so important. It opens the door to the rest of our rights.”

sugaryumyum:

Argentina: doing it right. After passing a groundbreaking gender identity law on Wednesday, Argentina, which became the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage, now leads the entire world when it comes to trans rights.

The new law, which was passed by 55-0 and is expected to be signed by president Cristina Fernandez, grants trans people the right to legally change their gender identity without having to get approval from doctors or judges–and, importantly, without having to change their bodies at all first. Not having a valid ID that matches your gender identity is a huge barrier to access to education, employment, health care, you name it. As Kalym Sori, an Argentinian trans man said, “This is why the law of identity is so important. It opens the door to the rest of our rights.”

(via hueva-york)

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(Source: jarelion, via orxnahhh)

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iridessence:

Black and brown.

Queerin’ up your side of town.

(via momdiggity)